Marymount July 25, 2009

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I’m an alumna of what I consider to be (or have been) a rather prestigious institution. This post is for my fellow alumnae, who knew and loved our campus and school well.

I visited (some may see it as trespassed) yesterday and was none too pleased with several discoveries. I had last visited at the end of March, and did not find anything too disturbing, except of course for the transformation that the chapel had undertaken into a student lounge complete with pool tables. Vulgar. The pews have been scattered throughout the building of classrooms.

On this trip, my accomplice and I discovered that Gerard is being torn up, at least thus far on the level that once housed professor offices.

View from door window.
View from door window.

There were signs warning about asbestos near the entrances to that floor, so we didn’t get too close. Besides workers were inside, some seemingly not wearing much under their Hazmat-like suits. Yikes.

Door to professor offices, near elevator stairwell in Gerard.
Door to professor offices, near elevator stairwell in Gerard.
Sitting water, just outside the elevator, again on the level of the professor offices in Gerard. Good to see that the workers are being careful.
Sitting water, just outside the elevator, again on the level of the professor offices in Gerard. Good to see that the workers are being careful.

We managed to enter the library, which was a ghost town. In fact I think we stumbled upon a guard taking a nap in the quiet confines. It seems like much of the material is gone, but some items remain scattered about. We later found a lot of books, still marked with library stickers, in EF classrooms in Marion Hall.

Old circulation desk.
Old circulation desk.
Only other shot I could manage without really arousing suspicion.
Only other shot I could manage without really arousing suspicion.
Displaced books in Marion Hall. I'm sure those EF kids appreciate them.
Displaced books in Marion Hall. I'm sure those EF kids appreciate them.

As you might have guessed, EF has tried to transform any and every space into either a classroom or dorm space. Even the old weaving center is now a ‘drawing’ center.

Art studio. Not too different surprisingly.
Art studio. Not too different surprisingly.
Former kitchen for home-ec students, now a catch-all for unwanted items. It was locked - picture taken from door window.
Former kitchen for home-ec students, now a catch-all for unwanted items. It was locked - picture taken from door window.

And, quite annoyingly, the EF students get to live in the Butler dorm halls. Those little shits don’t even appreciate what they have. We even saw several groups lounging on the lovely old furniture in Butler parlors, with their feet on the furniture. I had to restrain myself from attacking.

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EF darlings.
EF darlings.

And in case you were wondering, security is really doing a great job up there. Not! We managed to get into the actual dome for the third time ever (a few times when we were actual students there), with absolutely no hassle.

View of Tappan Zee from dome window.
View of Tappan Zee from dome window.
Interior of that golden beacon.
Interior of that golden beacon.
There's some really great retro furniture just languishing up there.
There's some really great retro furniture just languishing up there.

Just wanted to share what we found. I guess at least we should be grateful that the buildings are still intact.

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8 thoughts on “Marymount July 25, 2009

  1. That makes me so sad….. and angry! We need to push historic designation so they don’t transform the outside of our beloved buildings.

  2. I also went to visit MMC Oct. 09. It was disgusting. I can’t believe MM is gone. Rita was being stripped. I wanted to (steal) the huge rubber mat just inside the door, it had the school name (or initals, I dont quite remember) on it.
    I lived in Butler so I took a look upstairs. The place looked awful. I asked one of the girls if I could go in the dorm room. It was stark, ugly, not at all how I remembered it. Also, the students did not speak any English.
    This was a wonderful, beautiful school that our daughters will never have the opportunity to experience. So sad.

  3. Wow I am just now learning what happened to our beloved campus. I want to cry I still remember my first day at Marymount and lovely it was to see the beautiful golden dome from the Tappan Zee Bridge. I feel it is a great historic landmark.

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